#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 30/03/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Claimed By The Zandian – by Renee Rose and Rebel West

Blurb:

I CAN’T CLAIM HER…BUT SHE WILL CALL ME MASTER.

I was born blind. My genes are defective.

Unsuitable for breeding.

That’s the only reason I don’t claim the alluring human

we rescued from a slave auction.

I have no intention of mating her,

especially since she’s meant for another.

But when she calls me Master, I can’t help but take command.

And command I will. 

Review:

Tarek is blind, and because of his blindness, despite his briliant other skills, he refuses to allow himself to accept a mate. Until he meets her… Despite his best intentions he just can not stay away.

I couldn’t say I normally pick up alien romance books, but after reading a previous alien romance book by another author I thought I would give this one a try. I fell into the story very quickly bonding with the characters and getting myself emotionally involved in the story.

As this was a fairly short book I was disappointed when it ended, wishing I could spend longer in Tarek’s world. 

This was my first book I’ve read in this series, but will definitely not be my last. Cannot wait to get my hands on another in the series!

[K]


The 50/50 Killer – Steve Mosby

Blurb:

The 50/50 killer preys on couples.

He manipulates their love for each other and makes them play a game.
He stalks them, tortures them and then forces them to choose.
What is going to break first? Their will or their love for each other?
Only two things are certain:
One of them will die.
And the other will have killed them.

Review:

When I first saw this book the cover was the first thing that attracted me to it.  What was meant by a 50/50 killer? When I discovered this was because the killer chose couples and made them chose who should die I found this to be an intriguing concept.

Within the first few pages I was hooked, no slow build up to the action, that started right from the very beginning.

The story twists and turns really well, just as I thought I had worked out who the killer was, there was another element thrown into the mix that confused my theories. 

This was my first book by this author, but I will actively be looking for more of his work as I do enjoy a good well written psychological thriller.

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 23/03/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

The Corner Shop In Cockleberry Bay – Nicola May

Blurb:

Rosa Larkin is down on her luck in London, so when she inherits a near-derelict corner shop in a quaint Devon village, her first thought is to sell it for cash and sort out her life. But nothing is straightforward about this legacy. While the identity of her benefactor remains a mystery, he – or she – has left one important legal proviso: that the shop cannot be sold, only passed on to somebody who really deserves it.

Rosa makes up her mind to give it a go: to put everything she has into getting the shop up and running again in the small seaside community of Cockleberry Bay. But can she do it all on her own? And if not, who will help her succeed – and who among the following will work secretly to see her fail?

There is a handsome rugby player, a sexy plumber, a charlatan reporter and a selection of meddling locals. Add in a hit and run incident and the disappearance of a valuable engraved necklace – and what you get is a journey of self-discovery and unpredictable events.

With surprising and heartfelt results, Rosa, accompanied at all times by her little sausage dog Hot, will slowly unravel the shadowy secrets of the inheritance, and also bring her own, long-hidden heritage into the light.

Review:

When we first meet Rosa she is sharing a house with a friend, working a dead end job which barely pays the bills, let alone lets her actually have a life.  But then a mysterious legacy appears, she moves herself down to a run down corner shop in a little bay in Devon, determined to make the shop a success.

I found this to be a lovely story, that keeps you reading. I loved Rosa’s character and her interactions with the other people that appear in the book. 

I cannot wait to see where Rosa’s story takes her next!

[K]


Ricochet Joe – Dean Koontz

Blurb:

Can an ordinary guy make extraordinary choices in a battle between humanity and unearthly evil?

Joe Mandel is a perfectly ordinary guy from a perfectly ordinary town—a college student and community volunteer who dreams of one day publishing a novel. When a series of strange intuitions leads him to a crime in progress, Joe jumps headlong into danger without hesitation. In the aftermath, he wonders about the uncanny impulse that suddenly swept over him.

Until new friend Portia Montclair, the strangely wise daughter of the local police chief, explains to him what sent him ricocheting around town like a crazy pinball. Portia tells of another reality, a reality more thrilling—and terrifying—than Joe ever imagined. Timeless, elemental forces of good and evil have come to the quiet town of Little City: a cosmic entity capable of infecting human beings, and the seeker who has chosen Joe to find it.

To stop the malevolent invader, this average Joe must be braver than he ever thought possible…and face the hardest decisions of his life.

Review:

When we meet Joe, he is just an average person, an ‘Average Joe’ if you will. But when working as a community volunteer he has a strange intuition which  propels him to go to where the vision is. There he finds a crime being committed Joe intervenes without a thought for his own safety.

After meeting a new friend Joe learns what his new impulses are actually leading him to…

When I first picked up this book it was via Prime Reading and with the added animation I thought this would be a fun read. I was not disappointed.

I found this to be a very inventive story and loved the idea of someone having visions that propels them around the city like a pinball in a machine, meeting some strange and wonderful characters, eventually leading them to fight humankind.

Even though this is a standalone story, I do wonder if we will be seeing Ricochet Joe again sometime in the future.

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 16/03/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

TFL: The Story Of The London Underground – David Long, Sarah McMenemy (Illustrator)

Blurb:

When the first passengers climbed aboard the earliest ever underground train in 1863, it would have been impossible to imagine how the London Underground would change and grow over the next 150 years. From smelly steam trains running along a single track to the innovative electric tube system speeding through a vast network of tunnels beneath our feet today, the London Underground keeps this busy city on the move.

The Story of the London Underground tells the extraordinary history of the world’s most famous underground railway. Explore Victorian London as the Brunels dig deep under the Thames. Take refuge in the tunnels during World War II and discover which world leader’s bath was found in an abandoned station. Marvel at the famous fossil wall, deserted ghost stations and unusual spiral escalators that are all part of the London Underground’s fascinating history.

Published in association with TfL, this beautiful book from Blue Peter Award-winning author David Long and exceptionally talented artist Sarah McMenemy tells a captivating story of the London Underground that will delight children and grown-ups alike.

Review:

I picked this book up on a whim as it caught my eye on the library shelf. I have always been interested in the history of the London Underground but never spotted anything to read.

Whilst this was aimed a children full of illustrations and colour I found this to be a very interesting and informative book on the history of the London Underground.  I would recommend this book to children and adults alike. 

By reading I have learnt quite a few new things that will be very handy for the next pub quiz!

[K]


Photographing The Dead – Dean Koontz

Blurb:

A self-styled artist is getting away with murder in Death Valley. If all goes well, so will Nameless. In part two of the Nameless series, the relentless avenger is haunted by nightmares of the past and visions of what’s to come.

Palmer Oxenwald’s hunting ground is the Mojave wasteland. His victims are random tourists and hikers. His trophies are cherished photographs of the damage he’s done. His greatest threat is Nameless. Two men with one thing in common: memories of the dead. For a psychopath like Palmer, they’re a clear rush in black and white. For Nameless, they’re visions of violence buried and erased. But for how long?

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz comes Photographing the Dead, part of Nameless, a riveting collection of short stories about a vigilante nomad, stripped of his memories and commissioned to kill. Follow him in each story, which can be read or listened to in a single sitting.

Review:

This is book 2 in the Nameless series.

Nameless is directed to Death Valley to stop a murderer. This killer takes photos to immortalise his victims after death, but if Nameless succeeds he will not be photographing anyone else.

Another  brilliant short story in this series. Fast paced and a fast read I cannot wait to start book 3 to see what happens next!

[K]

To read [K]’s review on book 1 in the Nameless series please click here: In The Heart Of Fire


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 09/03/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Torn Apart – Aria Adams

Blurb:

“I was an enslaved mermaid. Now I have legs. And my master is coming for me.”

Taken as a child. Trained underwater. Lied to and manipulated. Aylia escapes by accident, but once she glimpses the surface world, she never wants to go back. Although she cannot speak, Prince Edward falls for her, and swears to protect her. But when her evil master returns, how can Edward disentangle Aylia from the dark wizard’s clutches?

This 40,000-word novel is a dark fairytale retelling of The Little Mermaid. The heroine has an unreliable point of view. The hero cannot always save her. And the villain is very evil. If you don’t like your HEAs to come easily, this series is for you.

Formerly a short story entitled Grim Mermaid, this novel has been vastly expanded and re-written.

Review:

Aylia does not have an easy life, living a life of enslavement she awaits her Master to give him pleasure that he approves of. Unfortunately this is rarely the case to Aylia is regularly punished for her lack of commitment to her ‘tasks’.

When I saw this was a dark retelling I wanted to give this book a try, as I have read other dark retellings of myths and fairytales and found them adapted well.

The story starts really rather quickly and I sympathised with Aylia and her plight, wishing for her escape from her horrendous treatment from her Master.

I don’t want to give too much of the story away, but I thought the characters were well developed. The story flowed well and loved the twists in the story.

This was my first book by Aria Adams, but I will definitely be picking up another of her books soon. 

[K]


In The Heart Of Fire – Dean Koontz

Blurb:

A bloodthirsty sheriff is terrorizing a small Texas town where justice has been buried with his victims. Until Nameless arrives—a vigilante whose past is a mystery and whose future is written in blood.

Anyone who crosses Sheriff Russell Soakes is dead, missing, or warned. One of them is a single mother trying to protect her children but bracing herself for the worst. Nameless fears the outcome. He’s seen it in his visions. Now it’s time to teach the depraved Soakes a lesson in fear. But in turning predators into prey, will Nameless unearth a few secrets of his own?

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz comes In the Heart of the Fire, part of Nameless, a riveting collection of short stories about a vigilante nomad, stripped of his memories and commissioned to kill. Follow him in each story, which can be read or listened to in a single sitting.

Review:

Nameless is a vigilante, with no name and no past, he receives instructions to visit a small Texas town where there have been disappearances. He has random visions of the future, can he prevent another disappearance?

This is one of my first books by Dean Koontz (surprisingly) and I really enjoyed this short story, the first in the Nameless series and found it a very fast read.

I am looking forward to reading the next short read in this series soon.

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 02/03/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Cole – by Tijan (Goodreads Author),

Stephen Dexter (Narrator ), Laura Darrell (Narrator)

Blurb:

I shouldn’t have remembered him.

He was just a guy who walked through a restaurant. I didn’t know his name. We never made eye contact. There was no connection between us at all.

But I could feel him.

The tingle down my spine. The command in his presence. The snap of tension in the air around him. That was the first time I saw him, and I was captivated.

The second time was different.

He was in the mysterious back elevator of my apartment building. Our eyes met for a fleeting second before the doors closed, and I was staggered. My breath was robbed. My senses on high alert. My body hummed.

That was just the beginning.

He was the leader of the mafia. I was about to fall in love with him, and his name…

Cole Mauricio

Review:

This audiobook revolves around the mysterious Cole, a man of few words but is not easily forgotten. Especially for Addison and her friend who sees him in a restaurant.

When we meet Addison she is still grieving for the loss of her husband who died suddenly. To help her move on she decides to move out of the home she had shared with her husband into the very modern and exclusive apartment block. 

This was my first audiobook and I listened to this as a standalone as I haven’t read/listened to the Carter Reed series but this didn’t detract from my enjoyment and understanding of the story. I found the narrator to be very good at reading the story and expressing the emotions, so I felt them with the characters as the book progressed.

My only regret is that I took so long to listen! I will definitely be picking up the other audiobooks in the series so I can listen to how Carter Reed got where he is in his life.

[K]


The Raven – Edgar Allen Poe

Blurb:

“The Raven” is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven’s mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man’s slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further distress the protagonist with its constant repetition of the word “Nevermore”. The poem makes use of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references.

Review:

Whilst I know a little of Poe’s poem ‘Quoth the Raven, Nevermore!’ And that it used to spook/unsettle the Victorians when it was originally written I had never read the full poem.

I found this to be a longer poem than expected and I am still finding my poetry feet. 

I did find this to be a very good read, but personally I think I would benefit better from a re-read or even having it read to me, after I know a little more background regarding the subject matter.

If anyone fancies reading this poem to me so I can find a better appreciation for this classic, please let me know!

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 24/02/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

No Middle Name: The Complete Collected Jack Reacher Stories – Lee Child

Blurb:

Jack ‘No Middle Name’ Reacher, lone wolf, knight errant, ex military cop, lover of women, scourge of the wicked and righter of wrongs, is the most iconic hero for our age. This is the first time all Lee Child’s shorter fiction featuring Jack Reacher has been collected into one volume. Read together, these twelve stories shed new light on Reacher’s past, illuminating how he grew up and developed into the wandering avenger who has captured the imagination of millions around the world.

The twelve stories include a brand new novella, Too Much Time.

The other stories in the collection are:

Second Son
James Penney’s New Identity
Guy Walks Into a Bar
Deep Down, High Heat
Not a Drill
Small Wars

All of which have previously been published as ebook shorts.

Added to these is every other Reacher short story that Child has written:

Everyone Talks
Maybe They Have a Tradition
No Room at the Motel
The Picture of the Lonely Diner

Review:

Whilst I have seen the Jack Reacher films this is the first book I have read. This is a set of short stories that have occurred throughout Reacher’s life. Whilst I did enjoy majority of these stories, the ones where he was a child ad his whole family deferred to his decisions in reaction to certain incidents I found very unbelieveable which affected my enjoyment of that particular story.

Despite this I am wanting to pick up book number 1 in the series so I can better enjoy Reacher’s adventures.

[K]


If you have read this far down in the post hoping for a second review I do apologise. Due to personal commitments I have just run out of reading time this week.

Thank you for your patience and I hope to be back up to usual reading speed soon.

[K]


Have you read No Middle Name? Or any of the other books previously featured in Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts!

#MiniReviewMonday | #MovieMonday | DIRTY, SEXY, SAINT aired 2019 by Passionflix @PassionFlix | Original story by Carly Phillips and Erika Wilde @carlyphillips @erikawilde1

Today we have a little something different for you, not a mini book review a film review. Enjoy!

Summary:

Clay Kincaid hates the nickname ‘Saint’, he got for being too kind to stray animals and desperate people. Especially when it comes to women. With a rough and damaged past that has left him jaded, he doesn’t do committed relationships. This is before he meets Samantha Jamieson, an heiress turned runaway in need of help. When she starts to work as a waitress at his bar, he discovers that she is someone truly special and amazing… someone that could warm his damaged heart.

Review:

Another novel, another PassionFlix adaptation and once again a novel I haven’t had the chance to read. 

I really should read the novels before watching these adaptations, to give myself the background knowledge to appreciate the films more. With Dirty, Sexy, Saint we have a good story, a clear leading couple and plenty of action of the intimate variety.

The film is a good watch, no real emotional investment on my part personally due to not being familiar with the story but the actors work well with the material, the chemistry between them convincing on screen. 

This is another film where we’re thrown into the story and watch as everything unfolds before us, never once doubting the pace of the plot. I felt like this film does have the potential to be fleshed out, as if more elements from the source material could have been used.

As with any film adaptation, its difficult to include every detail from a book, but this is something that all book lovers wish for when their favourites are being brought to life on screen. Again I’ve not read the novel Dirty, Sexy, Saint, so am unable to ascertain to any missing details but whilst I enjoyed the film, for me, this is one I’ll watch once and probably not pursue again.

*M* 

You can find more information regarding Dirty Sexy Saint on Carly Phillip’s website CarlyPhillips.com/dirty-sexy-saint-movie

To join Passionflix please visit their website Passionflix Website

Have you seen Dirty Sexy Saint? Or do you recommend any other series for us to watch? Let us know in the comments below!

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 10/02/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

The Breath Of Aoles – Alan Spades

Blurb:

Pelmen hates being a tanner, but that’s all he would ever be, thanks to the rigid caste system amongst his people, the hevelens. Then he meets Master Galn Boisencroix and his family. The master carpenter opens up a world of archery to young Pelmen, who excels at his newfound skill. But Pelmen’s intractable father will have none of it, and tries to force Pelmen to stay in the tannery.

One day, however, Pelmen’s best friend and Master Galn’s son, Teleg, disappears. Lured away by the prospect of untold riches through mining amberrock, the most precious substance in the world, Teleg finds himself a prisoner of the Nylevs, fierce fire-wielding worshippers of the god of destruction.

Now Pelmen must leave all he knows behind, overcome his fears and travel across the land, in search of his childhood friend. Along the way, he will ally himself with strange and fantastic beings: a shaman who controls the Breath of Aoles, or the power of the wind, a krongos, a creature of the mineral realm who can become living rock, and a malian, adept at water magic.

Review:

I loved the story and how you got to know the well developed characters through the book and really looking forward to reading the following book and what adventures happens to Pelman and his Uncle next.

This was a brilliant fantasy novel and well recommended to fans of JRR Tolkein and the like

[K]


Gratitude by Dani DiPirro

Blurb:

Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and doesn’t take much time, but the benefits can be enormous, helping you focus on what you have rather than what you don’t: friends and family, positive personal qualities, your surroundings, a healthy body, a vibrant mind, and the list goes on. Perfect as either a gift or self-purchase, this lovely little book features 18 inspirational quotes on the theme of gratitude, each one followed by an insightful explanation, a thought-provoking activity or question, and a memorable affirmation – all intended to inspire readers to think about gratitude in a fresh way as well as encouraging them to incorporate it into their everyday lives. Research has shown that grateful people tend to be more relaxed, less envious, more humble, more emotionally resilient, less materialistic, with increased energy, self-esteem and productivity, and stronger relationships. What’s more, when children see a thankful parent, they are more likely to become thankful children. With its appealing design, uplifting content and friendly tone, this discerning little book on gratitude provides beautiful, bite-sized inspiration for people around the world to feel more grateful, contented and at peace in life.

Review:

This was a lovely colourful little book, that does make you think about what you have in life, what is important and how to appreciate it.

I will be placing this on my coffee table which I’m sure my visitors will be reading when they visit

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #MovieMonday | A BROTHERS HONOR aired 2019 by Passionflix @PassionFlix | Original story by Brenda Jackson @AuthorBJackson | 03/02/2020

Today we have a little something different for you, not a mini book review a film review. Enjoy!

Summary:

The Granger brothers Jace, Caden, and Dalton left behind their family’s Virginia estate and the bad memories it held after their father was falsely convicted for murdering their mother. Their dying grandfather’s request brings them home: to a failing business, a legacy of secrets and a deathbed promise to make things right. As the eldest brother, attorney Jace Granger is determined to take responsibility for Granger Aeronautics. Once there, the years of mismanagement seem impossible to untangle. As CEO, he hires a consultant to turn the company around. Smart, sexy Shana Bradford is the right person for the job and the right woman to turn Jace’s world upside down. She owns her own consulting business and knows how to handle difficult office situations, but finds it hard to resist the chemistry she feels with Jace. The passion between them is jeopardized when old secrets begin to emerge: a woman from Jace’s past suddenly reappears, and an explosive discovery that changes everything Jace thinks he knows about his parents. Jace Granger tried to leave his family history behind once before, but this time he needs to face the past or risk losing his future. 

Review:

PassionFlix have once again brought us an adaptation of a steamy novel and made it into one of their movies, giving us beloved characters in real life form. Whether or not you are familiar with this novel or PassionFlix, one thing is clear, the steamy scenes are not shied away from, at all. 

I haven’t read the novel which this film is based on, so am unfamiliar with the story and characters. Generally the film established our leads quickly and efficiently. We were thrown into the story with gusto and learn the ins and outs of the plot. The actors work well with the script they’re given, the female lead in particular is excellent, talented and a very beautiful lady. 

Overall this wasn’t one of my favourites from PassionFlix, the actors are great in the roles they inhabit but for me this is one film I don’t think I’ll be watching again. I am sure the novel is a great read and a trope of the genre, but the film hasn’t pushed me to pick up a copy of the novel.

Everyone has their own personal tastes, you will either love or hate a film adaptation from a beloved book, however this isn’t one I am invested in, not whole heartedly anyway. 

Hats off to PassionFlix for having the guts to take on some fantastic novels and the actors and actresses playing these characters, because they really are taking on a whole heap of expectations from readers. 

I’d say give this a watch if you want an easy, enjoyable movie with a bit of spice but for me, once was enough.

*M* 

You can find more information regarding A Brother’s Honor on Brenda Jackson’s website BrendaJackson.net/movies

To join Passionflix please visit their website Passionflix Website

Have you seen A Brother’s Honor film? Or do you recommend any other series for us to watch? Let us know in the comments below!

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 27/01/2020

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 06.27.17.png

Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Heaven To Betsy – Pamela Fagan Hutchins

Blurb:

Heaven to Betsy features Emily, Katie’s stateside best friend, in her own hilarious adventures.

When a dead body swan-dives from a balcony into the pool at a wedding, gossip comes to a halt about disgraced paralegal and former rodeo queen Emily—whose husband left her for a woman who’s really a man. Enter Jack, a secretive attorney and sexy mix of cowboy and Indian. She refuses to work for him until she learns about the disappearance of the six-year old daughter of his notorious client Sofia, the wedding shooter, who is also an illegal immigrant. Emily feels a strange affinity with the girl and launches a desperate search for her. Bodies pile up in her wake across Texas and New Mexico as the walls around her own secrets begin to crumble, and the authorities question whether the child is anything but a figment of her imagination.

See why the Katie & Annalise and Michele series have won contest after contest.
2014 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award, Romance, Quarter-finalist
2014 USA Best Book Award Winner (Fiction: Cross Genre: Finalist)
2012 Winner of the Houston Writers Guild Ghost Story Contest
2011 Winner of the Houston Writers Guild Mainstream Novel Contest
2010 Winner of the Writers League of Texas Romance Contest

Review:

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book, but I found I really enjoyed it and finished it rather quickly. The characters were well described, I loved that the main character Emily was an ex rodeo queen turned paralegal and not afraid to say what she thought. The story kept me turning the pages right until the very end.

I have never read a Pamela Fagan Hutchins novel before and after reading Heaven to Betsy I can’t wait to get my hands on the next!

[K]


Flights Of Fancy by Bernadette Bland

Blurb:

Life is filled with emotional highs and lows. Riding the wave of this experience is part of living, but for poet Bernadette Bland, dreaming was even more important. No matter the attitude, mood, or circumstance, Ms. Bland has always believed in the beauty of life. Never to be deterred from her heart’s desire, she has ridden her own life wave with an eye to her dreams and an eye to the beauty of nature.

In her new poetry collection, Flights of Fancy, Ms. Bland shares her imagery with the outside world. She delves into the lavish splendor of nature in “Drifting Grace: God’s Art Show.” She peers behind the protective mask of a weeping clown in “Behind the Mask.” She recalls watching her mother slowly grow old in the poignant “Mama.” In all her words, she reveals her deepest yearnings and fears with selfless honesty.

Flights of Fancy is an example of an imagination set free. Ms. Bland fills her poetry with wonder and will leave you longing to step out into the sun. She is not afraid to depict the sometimes traumatic rollercoaster of life; yet she encourages us to move on, move up, and not look back. Within every word, she calls to the reader, challenging each one of us to never stop dreaming!

Review:

I would never have said I was a fan of poetry and prose, but this little book has changed my mind. There are some lovely little poems, especially enjoyed Mom and the one about the Native American Indian, and there some good short stories.

Will definitely recommend this to people that want to try poetry but aren’t quite sure where to start

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts!