#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 14/10/2019

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

A Bird In The Hand – Ann Cleeves

Blurb:

Young Tom French was found dead, lying in a marsh on the Norfolk coast, with his head bashed in and his binoculars still around his neck. One of the best birders in England, Tom had put the village of Rushy on the birdwatching map. Everyone liked him. Or did they? George Palmer-Jones, an elderly birdwatcher who decided quietly to look into the brutal crime, discovered mixed feelings aplenty. Still, he remained baffled by a deed that could have been motivated by thwarted love, pure envy, or something else altogether. But as he and his fellow “twitchers” flocked from Norfolk to Scotland to the Scilly Isles, in response to rumors of rare sightings, George—with help from his lovely wife, Molly—gradually discerned the true markings of a killer. All he had to do was prove it . . . before the murderer strikes again.

Review:

George Palmer-Jones is a retiree and is persuaded to investigate the death of a popular birdwatcher. Obviously as he was brutally murdered the birdwatcher was not as popular as previously thought. As George makes his enquiries, the suspects that could have murdered Tom keeps on growing. Who had the motive and opportunity to kill this young twitcher?

This was a well researched book as Ann showed depth of knowledge in birdwatching and the terminology as the story developed. I did feel you could tell this was a novel written earlier in Anne’s career, as this book gave a different vibe to Vera. I am definitely looking forward to reading more in the series.

[K]


Until We Collide by Charlotte Fallowfield

Blurb:

What do you do when the guy you’re in love with is seeing someone else?

That’s the dilemma facing Paige Taylor. All of her life she’s only ever had eyes for the gorgeous Alec Wright, but despite their undeniable chemistry, their timing has always been off. Fast approaching her thirtieth birthday, Paige despairs of ever finding love and a happy ever after. Her best friend Poppie tells her that she can either watch life pass her by, or grab it with both hands. She convinces Paige to throw herself back into the dating pool, or she could be waiting for Alec forever.

What Paige didn’t expect was the catalogue of dating disasters to follow. A neck brace, jelly fish, stitches, flashing and an encounter with a gorilla were some of the most memorable. Despite some downright hilarious, humiliating and cringe worthy dates, her biological clock is ticking and Paige is determined to keep trying until she finds the one.

Was Alec Wright always her Mr. Right, or is he still out there waiting to be found?

Join Paige in her quest to find the ultimate prize. Love

Review:

Wow where has this book been hiding?

I loved the variety of characters in this book. The main character Paige is a lovely girl and this story follows her through the years from a never-been-kissed teenager as she tries to find love. Her first crush is Alec but unfortunately it never seems to be right time for them. So she tries to find a partner that will fill the Alec shaped hole in her heart. As the years pass Paige has a catalogue of mishaps and disasters, some laugh out loud funny and others cringeworthy.

This was a brilliant romantic comedy that fans of Love Rosie would enjoy. I will definitely be looking out for more from this author.

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 07/10/2019

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

To Kill A Critic (Jonathan Roper Investigates #2.5) – Michael Leese

Blurb:

WORDS ARE TRICKY THINGS.
A heart-felt compliment can make you feel fabulous but a blast of anger can wound deeply. They can even kill.
This gripping short story features a fresh outing for autistic detective Jonathan Roper. He’s called in when a world-famous critic is found murdered in his London penthouse.
As Roper soon discovers, the critic was uncompromising with his opinions, willing to beat-up the biggest stars of stage and screen if he felt they failed to deliver and his legion of fans loved his honesty.
Which gained him a formidable cast of enemies.
All Roper has to do is work out which of his many, many enemies had the determination to see him dead.
To Kill A Critic is the latest story of the unique partnership between Roper and DCI Brian Hooley.

Review:

Jonathan Roper is a police detective with a difference, he is Autistic. When a world famous Critic is unexpectedly killed in a brutal way he is called in to solve the case.

I found Detective Roper to be a well developed character with his autistic traits, which made him a very believable real person. Fast paced and engaging I found this to be a thrilling quick read. Once I picked it up I could not put it down until I got to the end.

This is a novella in the Jonathan Roper Investigates series, but I will definitely be picking up book 1 and starting the series properly after reading this.

[K]


The Breakdown – B A Paris

Blurb:

Cass is having a hard time since the night she saw the car in the woods, on the winding rural road, in the middle of a downpour, with the woman sitting inside—the woman who was killed. She’s been trying to put the crime out of her mind; what could she have done, really? It’s a dangerous road to be on in the middle of a storm. Her husband would be furious if he knew she’d broken her promise not to take that shortcut home. And she probably would only have been hurt herself if she’d stopped.

But since then, she’s been forgetting every little thing: where she left the car, if she took her pills, the alarm code, why she ordered a pram when she doesn’t have a baby.

The only thing she can’t forget is that woman, the woman she might have saved, and the terrible nagging guilt.

Or the silent calls she’s receiving, or the feeling that someone’s watching her…   

Review:

This was recommended to me by my mum can be abit of a harsh critic when it comes to books so I knew it was going to be good, and it did not disappoint.

What would you do if you took a shortcut home on a stormy night and found a car parked in a layby in the middle of the woods? Unless they signalled for help would you carry on driving? I would and that is exactly what Cass did too. To then find out the next morning the driver was murdered and was someone she knew.

With their house right near the woods where the driver was murdered and Cass forgetting things is she really safe?

With their house right near the woods where the driver was murdered and Cass forgetting things is she really safe?

I found this a fast paced page turner, which I found got even faster and unputdownable to the end

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 30/09/2019

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Lady Susan – Jane Austen

Blurb:

Beautiful, flirtatious, and recently widowed, Lady Susan Vernon seeks an advantageous second marriage for herself, while attempting to push her daughter into a dismal match.

Review:

How many styles of writing can Jane Austen do?! This was a very clever novel as it is written in the style of letters between the characters. The main character Lady Susan was another different style of writing for Jane Austen, rather than the shy and retiring, or headstrong heroine, this time Lady Susan is a willful, deceitful, manipulative person, and I absolutely loved the character.

Throughout the book we see how Lady Susan’s mind works, and what her plans are for herself and those around her, but also how the other characters interact and what they believe the sort of person Lady Susan is depending on what she wants them to believe her personality to be.

This was a very quick read and one I will definitely be picking up again!

[K]


The Crow Trap (Vera Stanhope #1) – Ann Cleeves

Blurb:

Three very different women come together at isolated Baikie’s Cottage on the North Pennines, to complete an environmental survey. Three women who each know the meaning of betrayal… Rachael, the team leader, is still reeling after a double betrayal by her lover and boss, Peter Kemp. Anne, a botanist, sees the survey as a chance to indulge in a little deception of her own. And then there is Grace, a strange, uncommunicative young woman, hiding plenty of her own secrets. Rachael is the first to arrive at the cottage, where she discovers the body of her friend, Bella Furness. Bella, it appears, has committed suicide – a verdict Rachael refuses to accept. When another death occurs, a fourth woman enters the picture – the unconventional Detective Inspector Vera Stanhope… 

Review:

I decided to try the Vera series as the TV series was going to be shown on the TV and was glad I did.

I found the story was well described and could visualise the moors and countryside that surrounds a cottage and farm which is the main setting for this book. It is a bit of a slow burner, Vera herself doesn’t appear straight away and the story revolves around the 3 women who come to visit the cottage to do an environmental survey, the first of whom finds the lady who lives in the farm has apparently committed suicide. Each of these ladies have good reasons for wanting to go to an isolate place and escaping the community, so when there is another murder will these secrets stay hidden?

I think this would be a good book for those that like Detective stories like Columbo.

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts!