#BookBag | #NewFeature | #MayBookBag | #WrapUp

Good evening everyone, [K] here

Here is my wrapup post from my fifth bookbag, a my Romance Author and Reader Events bag.

To recap my plan was to read the following books:

My RARE bag holds the following reads:

finish Dynasty: A Mafia Collection by Various (blog tour)

The Running Lie by Jennifer Young (blog tour)

Trust Me by Angela Clark

The Kompromat Kill by Michael Jenkins (blog tour)

Slow Down by Lee Mathew Goldberg (blog tour)

Don’t Dare Touch by Sonja Jesus (blog tour)

Watermarks: Life, Death and Swimming by Lenka Janiurek (blog tour)

The Price by Kerry Kaya (blog tour)

Don’t Dare Live by Sonja Jesus (blog tour)

Just Babies: The Origins Of Good And Evil by Paul Bloom

The Mermaid by Christina Henry

Lock No 1 by Georges Simenon

I actually managed to read in 17 books! Wow still quite fast on my reading, with lockdown only just being eased now it has helped my reading oppoturnities! In addition to my planned reads I also read/started:

An Apple Away by Kate Richards (audiobook)

Ax To Grind by Amelia Morgan (audiobook)

The Disappearance Of Timothy Dawson by Nathan Parker

Jane Austen’s Classic: Pride and Prejudice (with a study of themes, overview and famous quotes) by Jane Austen (audiobook)

That Holiday In France by Rhoda Baxter (blog tour)

How are you getting on with your reading this month?

Have you read any that I’ve read?

Let us know in the comments below!

[K]

#BookBag

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 30/09/2019

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Lady Susan – Jane Austen

Blurb:

Beautiful, flirtatious, and recently widowed, Lady Susan Vernon seeks an advantageous second marriage for herself, while attempting to push her daughter into a dismal match.

Review:

How many styles of writing can Jane Austen do?! This was a very clever novel as it is written in the style of letters between the characters. The main character Lady Susan was another different style of writing for Jane Austen, rather than the shy and retiring, or headstrong heroine, this time Lady Susan is a willful, deceitful, manipulative person, and I absolutely loved the character.

Throughout the book we see how Lady Susan’s mind works, and what her plans are for herself and those around her, but also how the other characters interact and what they believe the sort of person Lady Susan is depending on what she wants them to believe her personality to be.

This was a very quick read and one I will definitely be picking up again!

[K]


The Crow Trap (Vera Stanhope #1) – Ann Cleeves

Blurb:

Three very different women come together at isolated Baikie’s Cottage on the North Pennines, to complete an environmental survey. Three women who each know the meaning of betrayal… Rachael, the team leader, is still reeling after a double betrayal by her lover and boss, Peter Kemp. Anne, a botanist, sees the survey as a chance to indulge in a little deception of her own. And then there is Grace, a strange, uncommunicative young woman, hiding plenty of her own secrets. Rachael is the first to arrive at the cottage, where she discovers the body of her friend, Bella Furness. Bella, it appears, has committed suicide – a verdict Rachael refuses to accept. When another death occurs, a fourth woman enters the picture – the unconventional Detective Inspector Vera Stanhope… 

Review:

I decided to try the Vera series as the TV series was going to be shown on the TV and was glad I did.

I found the story was well described and could visualise the moors and countryside that surrounds a cottage and farm which is the main setting for this book. It is a bit of a slow burner, Vera herself doesn’t appear straight away and the story revolves around the 3 women who come to visit the cottage to do an environmental survey, the first of whom finds the lady who lives in the farm has apparently committed suicide. Each of these ladies have good reasons for wanting to go to an isolate place and escaping the community, so when there is another murder will these secrets stay hidden?

I think this would be a good book for those that like Detective stories like Columbo.

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 16/09/2019

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

A Monster Calls – Patrick Ness

Blurb:

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming…

This monster, though, is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor.

It wants the truth.

Review:

This isn’t normally a book I would pick up to read. But as it was made into a film I thought I would see what all the fuss was about.

Whilst this is written by Patrick Ness is was written from the original idea of Siobhan Dowd who unfortunately died of cancer before she could develop her idea.

There is some lovely artwork in the book and a very poignant story which pulls at your heartstrings.

Now I have read the book I am wanting to see the film to see if it measures up.

[K]


Persuasion – Jane Austen

Blurb:

‘She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older – the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.’

Anne Elliot seems to have given up on present happiness and has resigned herself to living off her memories. More than seven years earlier she complied with duty: persuaded to view the match as imprudent and improper, she broke off her engagement to a naval captain with neither fortune, ancestry, nor prospects. However, when peacetime arrives and brings the Navy home, and Anne encounters Captain Wentworth once more, she starts to believe in second chances.

Persuasion celebrates romantic constancy in an era of turbulent change. Written as the Napoleonic Wars were ending, the novel examines how a woman can at once remain faithful to her past and still move forward into the future.

Review:

This was read as part of the Ardently Austen Book Club being held on Instagram.

This story was a different style of writing compared to Austen’s previous novels as it seemed to poke gentle fun at the traditional plotline that follows a heroine and hero (meet, fall in love, drama, HEA) As life for the heroine Anne does not go to plan. The gentleman Frederick she was receiving attentions from she was encouraged to refuse his proposal. Time passes and Anne regrets her decision, her family is facing financial ruin but are refusing to take advice and Frederick has returned. Will there be a happy ever after for Anne or has she missed her chance at happiness?

I loved the variety of characters and how I really disliked some as I was meant to. I wish to visit the places described in the book, even if some are fictional.

I found this to be one of my more favourite of Austen’s novels and will definitely be picking it up again to read. 

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews |September 9th 2019

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Emma – Jane Austen

Blurb:

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, rich – and fiercely independent – is perfectly content with her life and sees no need for either love or marriage. Nothing, however, delights her more than interfering in the romantic lives of others. But when she ignores the advice of her good friend Mr Knightley and attempts to arrange a suitable match for her pretty, naive Harriet Smith, her well-laid plans soon unravel and have consequences that she never expected. 

Review:

I enjoyed this book. I found Emma to be a good character to initially dislike. She gave the impression she was knowledgeable about life and being in the best position to advise others, but as the story progresses Emma realises this is not the case and she has alot to learn.

I did find a few surprises in this novel, despite thinking I had worked out what was going to happen, on the next page my theory was disproved.

The character of Miss Bates I found more and more endearing as I
progressed through the book, as who does not know/met a Miss Bates in
their lives!

[K]


Orange Balloon – Samantha Priestley

Blurb:

Seeking sanctuary from his memories, a man carries a balloon, but its orange glow marks him as different from others: wounded. Water has fallen “from the heavens and covered him till it was in his eyes and mouth and ears.” All but drowning in the consequences of a moment of inattention, he blindly walks and prays, afraid of what he may find if he allows himself to look.

Review:

Despite this only being a short story, this had the feel of a bigger book. By the end I was empathising with the feelings of the main character and what they are going through. Together with the illustrations it all added depth to this book.

I’m not going to reveal much, as this will spoil the flow and understanding of this little story.

[K]

Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#ArdentlyAustenBookClub | #BookReview | SENSE & SENSIBILITY by Jane Austen (October 30th 1811) #ClassicFiction

SENSE AND SENSIBILITY by Jane Austen
September 25th 2017, Worth Press (Original Publication: 30th October 1811)

Sense and Sensibility’s two heroines – so utterly unlike each other – undergo the most violent passions when they are separated from the men they love. What differentiates them, and gives this extraordinary book its complexity and brilliance is the way each expresses her suffering.

Marianne – young, impetuous, ardent – falls into paroxysms of grief when she is rejected by the dashing John Willoughby; while her sister, Elinor – wiser, more sensible, more self-controlled – masks her despair when it appears that Edward Ferrars is to marry the mean-spirited and cunning Lucy Steele.

All, of course, ends happily – but not until Elinor’s ‘sense’ and Mariannes’ ‘sensibility’ have equally worked to reveal the profound emotional life that runs beneath the surface of Austen’s immaculate art. 

[K]’s Review;

Reading as part of an Ardently Austen Book Club readalong on Instagram this was my first ever Jane Austen story and from what I’ve read, her debut novel. Given the wide variety of reading material we have now this book is a bit of a slow burner and for a start I did struggle with the language used, but once I got used to the writing style, into the story and invested with the characters I found it flowed really well.

The story centres around two sisters Elinor and Marianne and their life. I found both to be strong characters, although disposed to bouts of histrionics, which to be fair I thought was within reason at times. In the modern world where women have a lot more free reign this was a reminder to me as to how life was for women in the late 18th century, how they were supposed to behave, what society expected from them and what hardships they could face.

I cannot wait to start the next book (PRIDE & PREJUDICE) in February.

-S.’s review;

My review for SENSE & SENSIBILITY is not too dissimilar to [K] in that when this readalong kicked off and I started to read the book, I found the language very try to get my head around. I found myself reading the same paragraph two or three times to understand what was happening!

I’m used to reading a lot of crime fiction with a strong female lead, one who doesn’t take any punches and goes up against pretty much all male counter parts. With this in mind, I found it a major shift to then look at Marianne and Elinor with how they behaved towards men…..then I remembered this book was written in the early 1800s! This book really does give you an insight into what life was life back then.

This was my first ‘proper’ classic fiction title and also my first Jane Austen novel. I’m glad I’ve read it now so I can try and act all smart over the dinner table (it’s not always appropriate to quote Fifty Shades….) but I wouldn’t say it’s a book I would go back and re-read.

Next on the list now is watching the movie adaption with Alan Rickman!

Have you read any Jane Austen? If so, what was your favourite?

Join in the book club over on Instagram!