#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 30/03/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Claimed By The Zandian – by Renee Rose and Rebel West

Blurb:

I CAN’T CLAIM HER…BUT SHE WILL CALL ME MASTER.

I was born blind. My genes are defective.

Unsuitable for breeding.

That’s the only reason I don’t claim the alluring human

we rescued from a slave auction.

I have no intention of mating her,

especially since she’s meant for another.

But when she calls me Master, I can’t help but take command.

And command I will. 

Review:

Tarek is blind, and because of his blindness, despite his briliant other skills, he refuses to allow himself to accept a mate. Until he meets her… Despite his best intentions he just can not stay away.

I couldn’t say I normally pick up alien romance books, but after reading a previous alien romance book by another author I thought I would give this one a try. I fell into the story very quickly bonding with the characters and getting myself emotionally involved in the story.

As this was a fairly short book I was disappointed when it ended, wishing I could spend longer in Tarek’s world. 

This was my first book I’ve read in this series, but will definitely not be my last. Cannot wait to get my hands on another in the series!

[K]


The 50/50 Killer – Steve Mosby

Blurb:

The 50/50 killer preys on couples.

He manipulates their love for each other and makes them play a game.
He stalks them, tortures them and then forces them to choose.
What is going to break first? Their will or their love for each other?
Only two things are certain:
One of them will die.
And the other will have killed them.

Review:

When I first saw this book the cover was the first thing that attracted me to it.  What was meant by a 50/50 killer? When I discovered this was because the killer chose couples and made them chose who should die I found this to be an intriguing concept.

Within the first few pages I was hooked, no slow build up to the action, that started right from the very beginning.

The story twists and turns really well, just as I thought I had worked out who the killer was, there was another element thrown into the mix that confused my theories. 

This was my first book by this author, but I will actively be looking for more of his work as I do enjoy a good well written psychological thriller.

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 16/03/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

TFL: The Story Of The London Underground – David Long, Sarah McMenemy (Illustrator)

Blurb:

When the first passengers climbed aboard the earliest ever underground train in 1863, it would have been impossible to imagine how the London Underground would change and grow over the next 150 years. From smelly steam trains running along a single track to the innovative electric tube system speeding through a vast network of tunnels beneath our feet today, the London Underground keeps this busy city on the move.

The Story of the London Underground tells the extraordinary history of the world’s most famous underground railway. Explore Victorian London as the Brunels dig deep under the Thames. Take refuge in the tunnels during World War II and discover which world leader’s bath was found in an abandoned station. Marvel at the famous fossil wall, deserted ghost stations and unusual spiral escalators that are all part of the London Underground’s fascinating history.

Published in association with TfL, this beautiful book from Blue Peter Award-winning author David Long and exceptionally talented artist Sarah McMenemy tells a captivating story of the London Underground that will delight children and grown-ups alike.

Review:

I picked this book up on a whim as it caught my eye on the library shelf. I have always been interested in the history of the London Underground but never spotted anything to read.

Whilst this was aimed a children full of illustrations and colour I found this to be a very interesting and informative book on the history of the London Underground.  I would recommend this book to children and adults alike. 

By reading I have learnt quite a few new things that will be very handy for the next pub quiz!

[K]


Photographing The Dead – Dean Koontz

Blurb:

A self-styled artist is getting away with murder in Death Valley. If all goes well, so will Nameless. In part two of the Nameless series, the relentless avenger is haunted by nightmares of the past and visions of what’s to come.

Palmer Oxenwald’s hunting ground is the Mojave wasteland. His victims are random tourists and hikers. His trophies are cherished photographs of the damage he’s done. His greatest threat is Nameless. Two men with one thing in common: memories of the dead. For a psychopath like Palmer, they’re a clear rush in black and white. For Nameless, they’re visions of violence buried and erased. But for how long?

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz comes Photographing the Dead, part of Nameless, a riveting collection of short stories about a vigilante nomad, stripped of his memories and commissioned to kill. Follow him in each story, which can be read or listened to in a single sitting.

Review:

This is book 2 in the Nameless series.

Nameless is directed to Death Valley to stop a murderer. This killer takes photos to immortalise his victims after death, but if Nameless succeeds he will not be photographing anyone else.

Another  brilliant short story in this series. Fast paced and a fast read I cannot wait to start book 3 to see what happens next!

[K]

To read [K]’s review on book 1 in the Nameless series please click here: In The Heart Of Fire


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 09/03/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Torn Apart – Aria Adams

Blurb:

“I was an enslaved mermaid. Now I have legs. And my master is coming for me.”

Taken as a child. Trained underwater. Lied to and manipulated. Aylia escapes by accident, but once she glimpses the surface world, she never wants to go back. Although she cannot speak, Prince Edward falls for her, and swears to protect her. But when her evil master returns, how can Edward disentangle Aylia from the dark wizard’s clutches?

This 40,000-word novel is a dark fairytale retelling of The Little Mermaid. The heroine has an unreliable point of view. The hero cannot always save her. And the villain is very evil. If you don’t like your HEAs to come easily, this series is for you.

Formerly a short story entitled Grim Mermaid, this novel has been vastly expanded and re-written.

Review:

Aylia does not have an easy life, living a life of enslavement she awaits her Master to give him pleasure that he approves of. Unfortunately this is rarely the case to Aylia is regularly punished for her lack of commitment to her ‘tasks’.

When I saw this was a dark retelling I wanted to give this book a try, as I have read other dark retellings of myths and fairytales and found them adapted well.

The story starts really rather quickly and I sympathised with Aylia and her plight, wishing for her escape from her horrendous treatment from her Master.

I don’t want to give too much of the story away, but I thought the characters were well developed. The story flowed well and loved the twists in the story.

This was my first book by Aria Adams, but I will definitely be picking up another of her books soon. 

[K]


In The Heart Of Fire – Dean Koontz

Blurb:

A bloodthirsty sheriff is terrorizing a small Texas town where justice has been buried with his victims. Until Nameless arrives—a vigilante whose past is a mystery and whose future is written in blood.

Anyone who crosses Sheriff Russell Soakes is dead, missing, or warned. One of them is a single mother trying to protect her children but bracing herself for the worst. Nameless fears the outcome. He’s seen it in his visions. Now it’s time to teach the depraved Soakes a lesson in fear. But in turning predators into prey, will Nameless unearth a few secrets of his own?

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz comes In the Heart of the Fire, part of Nameless, a riveting collection of short stories about a vigilante nomad, stripped of his memories and commissioned to kill. Follow him in each story, which can be read or listened to in a single sitting.

Review:

Nameless is a vigilante, with no name and no past, he receives instructions to visit a small Texas town where there have been disappearances. He has random visions of the future, can he prevent another disappearance?

This is one of my first books by Dean Koontz (surprisingly) and I really enjoyed this short story, the first in the Nameless series and found it a very fast read.

I am looking forward to reading the next short read in this series soon.

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 02/03/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Cole – by Tijan (Goodreads Author),

Stephen Dexter (Narrator ), Laura Darrell (Narrator)

Blurb:

I shouldn’t have remembered him.

He was just a guy who walked through a restaurant. I didn’t know his name. We never made eye contact. There was no connection between us at all.

But I could feel him.

The tingle down my spine. The command in his presence. The snap of tension in the air around him. That was the first time I saw him, and I was captivated.

The second time was different.

He was in the mysterious back elevator of my apartment building. Our eyes met for a fleeting second before the doors closed, and I was staggered. My breath was robbed. My senses on high alert. My body hummed.

That was just the beginning.

He was the leader of the mafia. I was about to fall in love with him, and his name…

Cole Mauricio

Review:

This audiobook revolves around the mysterious Cole, a man of few words but is not easily forgotten. Especially for Addison and her friend who sees him in a restaurant.

When we meet Addison she is still grieving for the loss of her husband who died suddenly. To help her move on she decides to move out of the home she had shared with her husband into the very modern and exclusive apartment block. 

This was my first audiobook and I listened to this as a standalone as I haven’t read/listened to the Carter Reed series but this didn’t detract from my enjoyment and understanding of the story. I found the narrator to be very good at reading the story and expressing the emotions, so I felt them with the characters as the book progressed.

My only regret is that I took so long to listen! I will definitely be picking up the other audiobooks in the series so I can listen to how Carter Reed got where he is in his life.

[K]


The Raven – Edgar Allen Poe

Blurb:

“The Raven” is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven’s mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man’s slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student, is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further distress the protagonist with its constant repetition of the word “Nevermore”. The poem makes use of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references.

Review:

Whilst I know a little of Poe’s poem ‘Quoth the Raven, Nevermore!’ And that it used to spook/unsettle the Victorians when it was originally written I had never read the full poem.

I found this to be a longer poem than expected and I am still finding my poetry feet. 

I did find this to be a very good read, but personally I think I would benefit better from a re-read or even having it read to me, after I know a little more background regarding the subject matter.

If anyone fancies reading this poem to me so I can find a better appreciation for this classic, please let me know!

[K]


Have you read/listened to any of the books above? Or any previously featured on Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 24/02/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

No Middle Name: The Complete Collected Jack Reacher Stories – Lee Child

Blurb:

Jack ‘No Middle Name’ Reacher, lone wolf, knight errant, ex military cop, lover of women, scourge of the wicked and righter of wrongs, is the most iconic hero for our age. This is the first time all Lee Child’s shorter fiction featuring Jack Reacher has been collected into one volume. Read together, these twelve stories shed new light on Reacher’s past, illuminating how he grew up and developed into the wandering avenger who has captured the imagination of millions around the world.

The twelve stories include a brand new novella, Too Much Time.

The other stories in the collection are:

Second Son
James Penney’s New Identity
Guy Walks Into a Bar
Deep Down, High Heat
Not a Drill
Small Wars

All of which have previously been published as ebook shorts.

Added to these is every other Reacher short story that Child has written:

Everyone Talks
Maybe They Have a Tradition
No Room at the Motel
The Picture of the Lonely Diner

Review:

Whilst I have seen the Jack Reacher films this is the first book I have read. This is a set of short stories that have occurred throughout Reacher’s life. Whilst I did enjoy majority of these stories, the ones where he was a child ad his whole family deferred to his decisions in reaction to certain incidents I found very unbelieveable which affected my enjoyment of that particular story.

Despite this I am wanting to pick up book number 1 in the series so I can better enjoy Reacher’s adventures.

[K]


If you have read this far down in the post hoping for a second review I do apologise. Due to personal commitments I have just run out of reading time this week.

Thank you for your patience and I hope to be back up to usual reading speed soon.

[K]


Have you read No Middle Name? Or any of the other books previously featured in Mini Review Monday? Let us know your thoughts!

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 10/02/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

The Breath Of Aoles – Alan Spades

Blurb:

Pelmen hates being a tanner, but that’s all he would ever be, thanks to the rigid caste system amongst his people, the hevelens. Then he meets Master Galn Boisencroix and his family. The master carpenter opens up a world of archery to young Pelmen, who excels at his newfound skill. But Pelmen’s intractable father will have none of it, and tries to force Pelmen to stay in the tannery.

One day, however, Pelmen’s best friend and Master Galn’s son, Teleg, disappears. Lured away by the prospect of untold riches through mining amberrock, the most precious substance in the world, Teleg finds himself a prisoner of the Nylevs, fierce fire-wielding worshippers of the god of destruction.

Now Pelmen must leave all he knows behind, overcome his fears and travel across the land, in search of his childhood friend. Along the way, he will ally himself with strange and fantastic beings: a shaman who controls the Breath of Aoles, or the power of the wind, a krongos, a creature of the mineral realm who can become living rock, and a malian, adept at water magic.

Review:

I loved the story and how you got to know the well developed characters through the book and really looking forward to reading the following book and what adventures happens to Pelman and his Uncle next.

This was a brilliant fantasy novel and well recommended to fans of JRR Tolkein and the like

[K]


Gratitude by Dani DiPirro

Blurb:

Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and doesn’t take much time, but the benefits can be enormous, helping you focus on what you have rather than what you don’t: friends and family, positive personal qualities, your surroundings, a healthy body, a vibrant mind, and the list goes on. Perfect as either a gift or self-purchase, this lovely little book features 18 inspirational quotes on the theme of gratitude, each one followed by an insightful explanation, a thought-provoking activity or question, and a memorable affirmation – all intended to inspire readers to think about gratitude in a fresh way as well as encouraging them to incorporate it into their everyday lives. Research has shown that grateful people tend to be more relaxed, less envious, more humble, more emotionally resilient, less materialistic, with increased energy, self-esteem and productivity, and stronger relationships. What’s more, when children see a thankful parent, they are more likely to become thankful children. With its appealing design, uplifting content and friendly tone, this discerning little book on gratitude provides beautiful, bite-sized inspiration for people around the world to feel more grateful, contented and at peace in life.

Review:

This was a lovely colourful little book, that does make you think about what you have in life, what is important and how to appreciate it.

I will be placing this on my coffee table which I’m sure my visitors will be reading when they visit

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 27/01/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Heaven To Betsy – Pamela Fagan Hutchins

Blurb:

Heaven to Betsy features Emily, Katie’s stateside best friend, in her own hilarious adventures.

When a dead body swan-dives from a balcony into the pool at a wedding, gossip comes to a halt about disgraced paralegal and former rodeo queen Emily—whose husband left her for a woman who’s really a man. Enter Jack, a secretive attorney and sexy mix of cowboy and Indian. She refuses to work for him until she learns about the disappearance of the six-year old daughter of his notorious client Sofia, the wedding shooter, who is also an illegal immigrant. Emily feels a strange affinity with the girl and launches a desperate search for her. Bodies pile up in her wake across Texas and New Mexico as the walls around her own secrets begin to crumble, and the authorities question whether the child is anything but a figment of her imagination.

See why the Katie & Annalise and Michele series have won contest after contest.
2014 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award, Romance, Quarter-finalist
2014 USA Best Book Award Winner (Fiction: Cross Genre: Finalist)
2012 Winner of the Houston Writers Guild Ghost Story Contest
2011 Winner of the Houston Writers Guild Mainstream Novel Contest
2010 Winner of the Writers League of Texas Romance Contest

Review:

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this book, but I found I really enjoyed it and finished it rather quickly. The characters were well described, I loved that the main character Emily was an ex rodeo queen turned paralegal and not afraid to say what she thought. The story kept me turning the pages right until the very end.

I have never read a Pamela Fagan Hutchins novel before and after reading Heaven to Betsy I can’t wait to get my hands on the next!

[K]


Flights Of Fancy by Bernadette Bland

Blurb:

Life is filled with emotional highs and lows. Riding the wave of this experience is part of living, but for poet Bernadette Bland, dreaming was even more important. No matter the attitude, mood, or circumstance, Ms. Bland has always believed in the beauty of life. Never to be deterred from her heart’s desire, she has ridden her own life wave with an eye to her dreams and an eye to the beauty of nature.

In her new poetry collection, Flights of Fancy, Ms. Bland shares her imagery with the outside world. She delves into the lavish splendor of nature in “Drifting Grace: God’s Art Show.” She peers behind the protective mask of a weeping clown in “Behind the Mask.” She recalls watching her mother slowly grow old in the poignant “Mama.” In all her words, she reveals her deepest yearnings and fears with selfless honesty.

Flights of Fancy is an example of an imagination set free. Ms. Bland fills her poetry with wonder and will leave you longing to step out into the sun. She is not afraid to depict the sometimes traumatic rollercoaster of life; yet she encourages us to move on, move up, and not look back. Within every word, she calls to the reader, challenging each one of us to never stop dreaming!

Review:

I would never have said I was a fan of poetry and prose, but this little book has changed my mind. There are some lovely little poems, especially enjoyed Mom and the one about the Native American Indian, and there some good short stories.

Will definitely recommend this to people that want to try poetry but aren’t quite sure where to start

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 20/01/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Live Fast Die Hot – Jenny Mollen

Blurb:

By the New York Times bestselling author, a searingly funny collection of essays that explores life as a reluctant adult.

Hi, I’m Jenny Mollen. I’m a writer and actress living in New York with a husband, two dogs, and a baby. When I got married, I made all sorts of vows and promises, some of which I intended to keep (and others I just said in the moment to make my husband come faster). My life was exciting, sexy, and ever so slightly eccentric, with a man who fully embraced my crazy. He understood my need to occasionally stalk his ex-girlfriend or wear her old beach caftans around our house. He showed compassion when I got kicked off of jury duty for accidentally befriending the defendant over lunch break. He even found it sweet when I invited our drug dealer to Passover seder so he didn’t think we were only using him for drugs.

Then we had our son, Sid, and overnight, the fun-loving woman-child that my husband fell in love with was banished from our home. It was time to grow up, to be responsible, to brush my hair, to take vitamins, to send holiday cards, to listen to my voicemail. But what if I didn’t want any of those things? What if I wasn’t ready to be a role model because I still envisioned being discovered at the mall and becoming a real model? (Or at the very least a Top Model.) Sure, I was thirty-five but my boobs were only eighteen.

This book is about how terrifying and maddening it is to love something more than yourself. It addresses the important questions that all women face: Have I done enough with my life? How do I break up with my dogs now that I’ve met someone new? Is it weird to draw eyebrows on a baby? Is my house haunted? Will taking ayahuasca in Peru affect my son’s chances of getting into preschool?

Live Fast Die Hot is an unapologetic look at life after thirty, when I realized that maybe being terrified of responsibility just means that I actually care. And if so, I’m at least halfway there—right?

Review:

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book, but it was a fast paced, easy read with loads of humour and randomness.

When I started reading this I thought it was a fictional story, as surely no ones life could be like this, I was wrong, at times unbelievably true, I am now following Jenny Mollen on Instagram and Twitter awaiting her next adventure!

[K]


What Is A Near-Death Experience? by Dr Penny Sartori

Blurb:

Death is the only certainty in life yet many people shy away from thinking about it until something drastic happens such as the diagnosis of a life-threatening illness, or the sudden death of a loved one, which can throw us into turmoil. Yet, paradoxically, contemplating death and the frequently-experienced phenomenon of near-death experiences (NDEs) – which are so little recognised and supported within the traditional medical environment – can really help alter our relationship with death and release us from the fear that often surrounds it.

After an insightful introduction about why the subject of NDEs is so worth exploring, each chapter in this book addresses a key question: What are the Characteristics of an NDE, and are there different types? Are all NDE experiences pleasant, or can some be distressing? Who has NDEs and under what circumstances do they occur? How do they affect the people who have them, and how can this change their lives? How can NDEs be scientifically explained – aren’t they just hallucinations? What can we learn from NDEs, and can they change our attitude to life and death? Can a greater understanding of NDEs lead to an evolution in our consciousness and an enhanced sense of spirituality?

As such, this book really brings readers on an exploratory journey through the world of NDEs, challenging preconceptions about what they are and the impact they can have, encouraging us to accept and feel empowered by death, rather than living in fear of it, and giving us useful insights about life along the way.

Review:

Prior to reading this book I had heard of Near Death Experiences (NDE) but I knew little about them.

This was a very interesting insight, together with studies about what an NDE is and the variations it has been experienced. The information and studies are clear and proportioned well throughout the book.

This is definitely a book for those that wish to either learn or further their understanding about NDEs and what the experience can hold.

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 13/01/2020

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Watching Edie – Camilla Way

Blurb:

Beautiful, creative, a little wild… Edie was the kind of girl who immediately caused a stir when she walked into your life. And she had dreams back then—but it didn’t take long for her to learn that things don’t always turn out the way you want them to.

Now, at thirty-three, Edie is working as a waitress, pregnant and alone. And when she becomes overwhelmed by the needs of her new baby and sinks into a bleak despair, she thinks that there’s no one to turn to…

But someone’s been watching Edie, waiting for the chance to prove once again what a perfect friend she can be. It’s no coincidence that Heather shows up on Edie’s doorstep, just when Edie needs her the most. So much has passed between them—so much envy, longing, and betrayal. And Edie’s about to learn a new lesson: those who have hurt us deeply—or who we have hurt—never let us go, not entirely…

Review:

I can honestly say I LOVED this book!

From page one, it had drawn me in. The story is split ‘before’ and ‘after’ which initially I though could be a little confusing, but this worked brilliantly, keeping me guessing what may happen and reading right until the very surprising end.

Definitely one I’ll be recommending to other readers, and I’m hoping to read more by this author soon

[K]


Kiss The Bride: The Wedding Dress/The Wedding Kiss/Sparks Fly by Lucy Kevin

Blurb:

New York Times phenomenon Lucy Kevin returns to Rose Chalet, the most romantic wedding venue in San Francisco, bringing three more of her beloved wedding stories together in one volume!

The Wedding Dress

Dress designer Anne Farleigh creates pure magic with her ideas and her fabrics. She needs some of that magic to rub off when she meets charming P.I. Gareth Cavendish, who delivers some unexpected news.

The Wedding Kiss

Rose Martin is the owner of Rose Chalet. She’s so busy planning weddings for everyone else that she doesn’t realize her own special someone has been by her side all this time!

Sparks Fly

Businessman Will Scott only agrees to a feng-shui design consultation to be polite. He thinks the whole thing is hocus-pocus—until he gets to know interior designer Angelina Morgan and his no-nonsense demeanor falls under the magic power of love. 

Review:

I loved how the characters followed through each short story. Despite them only being short stories I found the characters and stories were well written and found once started I didn’t finish till I’d read the whole story. Definitely wanting to read more from Lucy soon!

[K]


Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts! 

#MiniReviewMonday | #BookReviews | 06/01/2020 | First one of the year!

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Never has a quote been so relevant to EVERY book worm around the globe (and further!). SO many books, but so little time! The same can also be said for book bloggers. We read that many books so we can share them with our audience, but we find ourselves short of time to write all our thoughts down in a comprehensive review.

This brings us nicely to ‘Mini Review Monday’. A place where, to compliment our current content, we can share with you some of our initial thoughts on books we have been reading over the last week.

Pirates: The Orgone Chronicles – Nobilis Reed

Blurb:

The Orgone Chronicles continues… After their adventures in “SCOUTS” [Book One of The Orgone Chronicles, and 2011 EPIC eBook Award Finalist] – Challers and Valka are safe, protected aboard the Pirate city-ship known as “Port.” The scars of their ordeal among the Scouts remain, however. Valka is stuck with a hyper-fertile Ovor body, and the only way for them to raise enough money to change her back, is for them to join the Worthies-reality-TV celebrities who are always on camera. In an environment where loyalty is dismissed and betrayal is rewarded, their love suffers its greatest test yet. Meanwhile, on Stakroya Station, their classmate Renedy wrestles with a budding sexuality that does not fit the station’s rigid mold. An intimate night with the man who has been chosen for her does not go well at all. Instead she finds herself attracted to another woman; a relationship the Station can never condone. Through it all, the sinister eyes of the Scouts see all. Freedom, for all involved, must be won again and again.

Review:

Sometimes starting a trilogy in the middle can be a little confusing, with this book this wasn’t the case.

The world was explained well without distracting from the story. The book had different points of view and was was easy to follow even when switching from different areas as well as viewpoints. After the end of each chapter it kept you wanting more, infact I can’t wait for the next book to see what happens next!

Definitely will be purchasing the first book, and I highly recommend them for readers who like this genre. 

[K]


From A Poison Pen by B P Smythe

Blurb:

From the extraordinary mind of B.P.Smythe comes a collection of ten short stories.

What happens when a member of the Hitler youth ends up in a concentration camp?… How does a beach side cocktail get in the way the way of one woman’s scheming?… What leads a teenage girl to reign down fire and brimstone?… Can a killer find a victim’s diary that incriminates him?…

This collection of dark, humorous and macabre tales explores the disturbing side of human nature.
`From a Poison Pen’ by B.P.Smythe is the first book in a trilogy of collected short stories.

Review:

Despite the size there is a surprisingly large collection of short stories.

There was a variety of characters in each story, and unpredictable storylines, there were twists that I didn’t see coming!

Looking forward to reading more from this author.

[K]


Well that’s the first mini review Monday of this year! Have you read any of the books above? Let us know your thoughts!